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Inpatient Alcohol And Drug Rehab Centers

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Inpatient Alcohol And Drug Rehab Centers

Your Guide To Finding The Right Rehab Center That Fits Your Needs

What Is Inpatient Rehab?

Inpatient rehab programs allow a person facing a drug or alcohol addiction to get treatment tailored to their individual needs. These residential programs address a wide variety of substance use disorders, and provide a patient with comprehensive and compassionate care. By living on-site at the treatment facility, patients are removed from the temptations and triggers of their former life and settled into a positive and supportive environment. Should a crisis arise, a person will have immediate access to the accountability and encouragement from the highly-trained staff of the rehab center, which is sometimes exactly what a person needs for a successful recovery.

Not All Addictions Are The Same

Everybody’s addiction is different, wrought by a diverse and complex combination of personal history, past experiences; along with physical and mental conditions. Addiction can foster a complexity of negative thought patterns, behaviors, and emotions, which if left unchecked, may continue to feed the fire of both the addiction and any co-occurring disorders that accompany it. Within each inpatient program, you will have access to a variety of treatment options which will support and engage you in a manner that encourages the development of critical coping skills and the positive behaviors necessary to cultivate long-lasting sobriety.

What Can Inpatient Rehab Include?

Inpatient Treatment may include any combination of the following opportunities:

What Disorders Do Inpatient Rehab Centers Treat?

Along with treatment of substance use disorders, and addiction, inpatient treatment can be used for the following dual diagnosis/co-occurring disorders and conditions:

Inpatient Rehab Programs Based On Length

When choosing an inpatient drug rehab facility, one of the factors you want to consider is the length of programs the facility offers. Because the severity of everyone’s addiction is different, the specific form and length of treatment may vary from person to person. The National Institute on Drug Abuse, comments that “Generally, for residential… treatment, participation for less than 90 days is of limited effectiveness, and treatment lasting significantly longer is recommended for maintaining positive outcomes.” Though ultimately we encourage you to seek treatment to this extent, we realize that this is not within everyone’s means—remember, any measure of treatment is always better than none.  Some of the options for duration of inpatient therapy are:
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Short-Term Inpatient Drug Rehab Programs

Short-term inpatient drug rehab programs provide options for individuals who may not have the financial means necessary to enroll in a longer residential program. These programs may vary anywhere from one week to 27 days, the duration of which is dependent on your specific needs and financial situation. These programs are not typically recommended for individuals who have severe addictions, as the time frame does not allow the care that is needed within these circumstances. Short-term programs are often utilized for individuals who may need to reinvest and refocus their attention on their recovery after a relapse, or for individuals who are suffering from less serious instances of substance abuse. Click the link below to learn more.

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28-30 Day Inpatient Drug Rehab Programs
This was the original length of drug treatment programs, and still retains favor as an appealing option for any number of people. These programs provide intensive treatment within a shorter period of time in comparison to other, longer programs. In order for these programs to be effective within this condensed time frame, treatment needs to garner an individualized approach that is founded on research-based treatment modalities.

These programs may work well for individuals who have concerns of time restrictions, such as those that have family, vocational, professional, or educational obligations. Many individuals who are seeking treatment for the first time are also apt to choose these. Lastly, 28-30 day inpatient drug rehab programs may work better for individuals who do not experience situations of long-term drug or alcohol abuse.

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60 Day Inpatient Drug Rehab Programs
Falling in the middle of the most typical length of stays, 60 day inpatient drug rehab programs allow for a happy medium for individuals who do not yet have large amounts of time to commit to their rehab, but struggle with more moderate cases of substance abuse or addiction. These residential stays allow a person more time to focus on their unique needs, while removing themselves from the potentially toxic or tempting nature of their day-to-day lives. All the elements of a conventional program will be present, including therapy, counseling, and other supportive therapies.

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90 Day Inpatient Drug Rehab Programs
Ninety day inpatient drug rehab programs provide opportunities for individuals who have more serious demands, facing an addiction that has been present for a greater duration of time and intensity than others. This increased amount of time grants the recovering individual more time to strip away the negative emotions, thoughts, and behaviors that plagued them, precipitating their drug or alcohol use. This presents them with a greater opportunity to commit more time, energy, and focus towards renewing and creating an adaptable set of coping skills that will serve to better protect them after their treatment is through.

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Year-Long (12 Months) Inpatient Drug Rehab Programs
These inpatient drug rehab programs exist to offer an individual an extended stay in the controlled setting of a residential facility. This option often sees individuals who suffer from severe and debilitating addictions, or individuals who have previously been sober, only to have heavily relapsed back into a life of drugs or alcohol. Focusing on your recovery for a year allows you the space to set aside the concerns and triggers that may exist in your life, for such a length of time, that you solidify healthier and sober patterns to found your recovery on. These programs are not for everyone, for that reason, please take time to reach out to us, and speak to your loved ones while you consider every aspect of your situation and treatment needs. Also, due to treatment length, the financial responsibility is greater.

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Long-Term Inpatient Drug Rehab Programs (1 year+)
These prolonged programs are, by design, a controlled residential stay of such length, that a person essentially completely set their life aside long enough to reforge a new foundation upon which to build their sober life on when they return home. A program of this length is not for everyone, and should be thoroughly considered before any decision is made.
Like a one year program, these long-term format programs present an opportunity for an individual who has struggled to find success in other programs of shorter lengths. These highly-intensive programs may be good for an individual who has encountered relapse numerous times. This is because they remove you from you life for such a significant amount of time, that you’re committed to learning a new lifestyle that completely revolves around sober living. Due to the duration of the stay, these programs carry a larger financial burden, however, various options do exist that may make the financial concerns a little less cumbersome.

Click here to learn more about long term rehab programs

The length of a person’s stay will depend on the length of the addiction, the drug of choice, or the potential existence of any other co-occurring disorders. Length of treatment also depends on a person’s financial situation. More severe addictions may require a longer duration of care. If a person is suffering from a co-occurring disorder such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), their length of care may be extended, as these elements can aggravate a substance use disorder if left untreated.

Types Of Treatment

Everyone has fears; and sometimes a person’s life is led by fear if they are suffering from an addiction. Let’s face it, the world can be a pretty scary place, and if you are suffering from an addiction, it can feel like nobody understands you. In an inpatient rehab treatment center, there are loving people who understand what you’re going through, and want to help you get your life back…

Gender/Identity Specific Inpatient Addiction Treatment Programs

When choosing an inpatient drug rehab program, one of the biggest concerns is choosing a program that offers individualized treatment that centers around a person’s lifestyle and specific needs. In order for a person to achieve an optimal measure of success, they need to be comfortable within the program they choose. Substance abuse and addiction do not recognize barriers due to a person’s gender or identity. When a person has an addiction, the core attributes manifest in the same way, creating harm and destruction to a person’s life, regardless of their gender or identify. For this reason, some individuals choose to enroll in a program that allows them a specific gender or identity preference.

Every person needs access to unparalleled treatment that offers them a sense of security and a recognition of their unique perspectives and needs. Perhaps a person would feel more comfortable being around individuals of their own gender, so that they don’t have to contend with any distractions they perceive may occur in a mixed-gender facility.

Whatever the reason, these options do exist, allowing a person to receive treatment in a men’s or women’s only program, or in one that is transgender friendly. Regardless of the gender or identity preference of the program, a person will have access to powerful treatment methods, that may include numerous components, including, but not limited to detoxification, medication-assisted treatment, various psychotherapies, family support and therapy, and aftercare services.

Inpatient Drug Rehab For Men

A men’s only inpatient drug rehab center provides men with the opportunity to receive treatment in a facility, or a separate section within a facility, that grants them the space to focus on their treatment needs. They will do so surrounded by peers of the same gender that may better comprehend their unique struggles and life path. The individuals they encounter within recovery may be able to understand them better due to shared experiences revolving around their role within their career, or of being a father or husband, or any other aspect that may have pertinence to clients within the program.

During these residential programs, men will not only confront their issues of addiction, but other factors that may influence the negative climate revolving around their drug or alcohol use. This may include learning how to proactively contend with the pressures, expectations, or demands of their life, while also teaching them how to better process their emotions as a means to better moderate their thoughts and behaviors. Every man will have the opportunity to leave treatment with an increased arsenal of coping skills, relapse prevention techniques, and interpersonal skills.

Inpatient Drug Rehab For Men

A men’s only inpatient drug rehab center provides men with the opportunity to receive treatment in a facility, or a separate section within a facility, that grants them the space to focus on their treatment needs. They will do so surrounded by peers of the same gender that may better comprehend their unique struggles and life path. The individuals they encounter within recovery may be able to understand them better due to shared experiences revolving around their role within their career, or of being a father or husband, or any other aspect that may have pertinence to clients within the program.

During these residential programs, men will not only confront their issues of addiction, but other factors that may influence the negative climate revolving around their drug or alcohol use. This may include learning how to proactively contend with the pressures, expectations, or demands of their life, while also teaching them how to better process their emotions as a means to better moderate their thoughts and behaviors. Every man will have the opportunity to leave treatment with an increased arsenal of coping skills, relapse prevention techniques, and interpersonal skills.

Inpatient Drug Rehab For Women

When a woman enters a facility that provides woman’s only care, she enters into a place that is by design, a sympathetic, compassionate, and supportive environment that will provide her with access to numerous treatment modalities geared towards helping her create a sober and successful life. Within these residential programs, women will be surrounded by peers that better understand and empathize her unique needs.

Perhaps she desires to be in a program with woman only, so that she has an opportunity to converse with and draw from the experiences of others who have also confronted some of the same experiences or expectations, whether they be due the role of mother or wife, or because of any professional or vocational demands. Whatever your reason, if you feel more comfortable working towards your recovery surrounded by only women, in a woman’s only inpatient rehab program, you will be privy to the possibility of leaving with the comfort of knowing you now carry a greater ability to cope, engage in self-care, and moderate your emotions and thoughts in a healthy and mindful way.

Inpatient Drug Rehab For Women

When a woman enters a facility that provides woman’s only care, she enters into a place that is by design, a sympathetic, compassionate, and supportive environment that will provide her with access to numerous treatment modalities geared towards helping her create a sober and successful life. Within these residential programs, women will be surrounded by peers that better understand and empathize her unique needs.

Perhaps she desires to be in a program with woman only, so that she has an opportunity to converse with and draw from the experiences of others who have also confronted some of the same experiences or expectations, whether they be due the role of mother or wife, or because of any professional or vocational demands. Whatever your reason, if you feel more comfortable working towards your recovery surrounded by only women, in a woman’s only inpatient rehab program, you will be privy to the possibility of leaving with the comfort of knowing you now carry a greater ability to cope, engage in self-care, and moderate your emotions and thoughts in a healthy and mindful way.

Transgender Friendly Inpatient Drug Rehab

Some reports suggest that transgender individuals suffer higher rates of substance abuse and addiction. Confronted with specific needs, these individuals may desire a program that embodies tolerance and acceptance of their gender identity and personal journey, so that they can focus and commit to their pursuit of a drug-free life. Being surrounded by peers that express greater empathy and the insight of shared experiences may help to foster an environment that is more conducive to the introspection and personal growth that is necessary to achieve success.

Sobriety doesn’t just entail a person quitting drugs or alcohol—it goes beyond that, embracing a transformation that occurs due to a myriad of changes, including those that occur on an emotional and behavioral level. A transgender individual has likely encountered challenges, thoughts, and emotions that may be more specific to their journey. Entering into a transgender friendly inpatient drug rehab facility will allow a person the opportunity to encounter peers that understand the context of their history, and the scope of their concerns for the future. Whether it be coming out, transitioning, or any other number of trials a transgender person may have faced, being in this accepting environment will grant you a venue by which to explore the complexities and facets that make up who you are, in order to better develop the positive thoughts and behaviors that are so critical to a successful drug-free life.

Transgender Friendly Inpatient Drug Rehab

Some reports suggest that transgender individuals suffer higher rates of substance abuse and addiction. Confronted with specific needs, these individuals may desire a program that embodies tolerance and acceptance of their gender identity and personal journey, so that they can focus and commit to their pursuit of a drug-free life. Being surrounded by peers that express greater empathy and the insight of shared experiences may help to foster an environment that is more conducive to the introspection and personal growth that is necessary to achieve success.

Sobriety doesn’t just entail a person quitting drugs or alcohol—it goes beyond that, embracing a transformation that occurs due to a myriad of changes, including those that occur on an emotional and behavioral level. A transgender individual has likely encountered challenges, thoughts, and emotions that may be more specific to their journey. Entering into a transgender friendly inpatient drug rehab facility will allow a person the opportunity to encounter peers that understand the context of their history, and the scope of their concerns for the future. Whether it be coming out, transitioning, or any other number of trials a transgender person may have faced, being in this accepting environment will grant you a venue by which to explore the complexities and facets that make up who you are, in order to better develop the positive thoughts and behaviors that are so critical to a successful drug-free life.

Religious Or Faith-Based Inpatient Rehab Programs
One of the most important facets of a good rehab program is that it meets each person where they are, respecting and recognizing the perspectives, values, beliefs, and motivating forces within their life that shape who they are. For many people, one of the most important factors that drive these things is a person’s religion. Whether it be a certain faith, or a particular denomination, religious or faith-based inpatient drug rehab programs exist to provide you with an opportunity to approach your pursuit of sobriety alongside of, and supported by, your religious beliefs. Due to its spiritual component, some, but not all of these programs may utilize Alcoholics or Narcotics Anonymous 12-Step programs within their treatment protocol.
Types Of Religious Programs
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Christian, Methodists, Baptists and other denominations
Catholic, Mormon, Christian, Protestant, Lutheran, Baptist, Methodist, Anglican, Evangelicalism, Presbyterian, Pentecostal

Christianity is based on the life and fundamental teachings of Jesus Christ. Those of the Christian Faith may find solace and comfort in an inpatient drug rehab program that focuses specifically on tenets of Christianity alongside of, and center within, rehabilitation. Within this designation, however, the focus of certain programs may get more specific, addressing the individual dynamics and doctrines of specific branches, the largest being Catholic, Eastern Orthodox Church, and Protestant, the latter of which has numerous denominations including, but not limited to Lutheran, Anglican, Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Pentecostal, and Evangelicalism. In addition, though considered by some a separate religion, the Mormon faith, or The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, also considers themselves Christians. A Christian inpatient drug rehab will allow you to use your faith as a dynamic tool to foster the change and growth that is so central to obtaining sobriety.

Buddhism
Buddhism originated in India and is based on the spiritual teachings of Buddha. For those that ascribe to Buddhist practices, a variety of treatment options exist that embrace the spiritual practices, beliefs, and traditions that this religion embodies. An individual can take part in the more traditional aspects of inpatient drug rehab, while pursuing the insight, knowledge, intentions, and ethical principles that are central to these teachings, in turn, granting them a balanced way by which to obtain sobriety.
Perhaps one of the most noteworthy practices of Buddhism that is utilized within rehab (and not just Buddhist rehabs) is the practice of mindfulness. Mindfulness directs a person towards a sense of acceptance, by teaching them to be present in the moment. This practice is often accompanied and accomplished by meditation, another predominant tenet of Buddhism. Mindfulness has shown so much promise as a tool for recovery, that it has been integrated into countless other forms of drug rehabilitation.

Buddhist Based Rehab

Greek Orthodox
Greek Orthodox, also referred to as Greek Orthodoxy, comprises a body of numerous churches, within the larger overarching branch of the christian faith, the Eastern Orthodox Church. Within the course of history, the term Greek Orthodox has also on many occasions been used synonymously with the Eastern Orthodox Church. A person may seek treatment in an inpatient drug rehab program that pairs Greek Orthodox beliefs alongside of other treatment methods, so that your faith may support and center your quest for a drug-free life.

Greek Orthodox Rehab

Islamic
An individual of the Islamic religion may find treatment that not only integrates more traditional or evidence-based practices within its inpatient drug rehab program, but one which addresses the unique faith needs and perspectives of the Islamic faith. Islam is the second largest religion in the world and is based upon the Quran. Due to this, there is likely a large constituent of individuals within the U.S. ascribing to Islam that are in need of treatment. Within treatment, these persons will be able to center themselves simultaneously both within their faith and search for sobriety, in a way that offers them greater strength, insight, and perseverance within their recovery.

Islamic Based Rehab

Hindu (Hinduism)
Often referred to as the oldest religion in the world, Hinduism is a religion largely based out of India and Nepal, however, adherents exist throughout the world, including the U.S. For an individual wishing to follow the theology and philosophy of this religion while seeking treatment, they may find guidance and support in a variety of inpatient drug rehab programs that offer services integrating components of Hinduism.
In this capacity, a person will not have to address their journey towards sobriety as separate from their life, instead being able to integrate it with one of the most important aspects of their life, their religion. During their time in rehab, a Hindu person may be able to engage in puja (worship) or meditation as a way to further ground and uplift themselves.

Hindu Based Rehab

Jewish (Judaism)
For the many that give themselves to this faith, they may find refuge, direction, and sobriety within inpatient drug rehabs that integrate elements of the Jewish faith, called Judaism, within their spectrum of treatment modalities. Individuals who ascribe to these practices, specifically those of the Torah, both in reference to the way of life and written teachings, will be able to devote time within their day and treatment to bind their faith and pursuit of sobriety together, creating a more solid and faith-filled foundation upon which to build their recovery on.

Jewish Based Rehab

Your practices of faith and sense of spirituality will serve as a powerful axis to keep you centered, inspired, edified, and accountable as you strive towards building a sober and fulfilling life. In turning to God, or another higher power, you glean greater solidarity, allowing this spiritual presence to fulfill your life in a way that drugs or alcohol could not. Programs may include detoxification, psychotherapies, family therapy and support, and aftercare services, and may or may not include medication-assisted treatments. In addition to these components, you will also focus on and develop other practices that center upon your faith. During these inpatient rehab programs, you will have time to further develop your faith, in turn enhancing your quest towards sobriety, by having time for prayer, religious studies, and education and support within spiritual principles and practices.
Non-Religious Inpatient Addiction Treatment Programs

For many years, the majority of rehab programs revolved around 12-Step programs that based their practicum on a higher power, which effectively left some with no belief, or no specific adherence to god or a higher power adrift. Fortunately, this has changed to keep up with the many advancements within addiction treatment, rendering these options only one direction effective treatment can take. Today, a variety of non-religious inpatient drug rehab programs, or secular programs, exist to help individuals learn to live a successful and fulfilling drug-free life.

These non-religious inpatient drug rehab programs do not expect that a divine intervention must occur in order for you to become sober, instead, they teach that the power resides within you, as fueled and directed by evidence-based treatment methods. These programs are often more holistic in nature, and may include a medical detox, a variety of psychotherapies, support and integrated therapy for family, aftercare services, and a variety of other components that cater to your diverse and individualized needs and interests.

Agnostic
An agnostic adheres to the notion that certain elements that are predominant to various professions of faith, including any number of religious, theological, or metaphysical assertions, are essentially unknowable. Because of this, an agnostic individual may become uncomfortable with certain professions or directives that religious programs ascribe to, and find that they do not obtain an optimal measure of insight or solidarity from them. To counter this issue, inpatient drug rehab programs exist that may be more appealing, in the capacity that a person need not profess or focus on faith, as a means to obtain or build their recovery upon. In this way, an agnostic may yet proactively strive towards sobriety, wellness, and better health.
Atheist
An atheist does not believe in a specific deity, in fact, they believe that there are no deities at all. This notion directly conflicts the theology and practice of faith-based rehabs, thus, rendering them vastly ineffective for the majority of individuals who proclaim atheism. Due to this, an atheist may refrain from enduring these constant references to faith and spiritual practice by choosing a non-religious inpatient drug rehab program. This allows sole focus to be on their recovery from the perspective that change exists due to their own means, and those of the treatment modalities, in terms of developing their inner strength, more positive behaviors, and greater coping skills.

12-Step Based Inpatient Treatment Centers

Twelve step programs are based on some of the oldest precepts in addiction treatment, and also one of the formats that are most commonly familiar to many. Typically, when a person thinks about a twelve step program, they might think about Alcoholics Anonymous, which indeed falls within this category. In addition to this, there is its counterpart, Narcotics Anonymous, which is designed to offer support to individuals struggling with addictions to other drugs. Beyond these two programs, there yet exists other 12-Step programs, offering even more options for individuals who seek the structure and accountability of support groups.

Regardless of the twelve step program, treatment mainly begins with a person admitting that they are essentially powerless over their addiction, while the remaining steps build off of the previous, gaining momentum further into the recovery process. Another important aspect of these programs is that they focus heavily on peer interaction, relying on group members to support and encourage each other as a way to progress through their recovery. Beyond this, a more limited number of programs may also offer detoxification services, medically-assisted treatment, assorted psychotherapies, relapse prevention, and family services. Choosing a twelve step based inpatient drug treatment program is a deeply personal choice, one that should revolve around many factors, including any desire for a faith-based program, the desired amount of group interaction, and need for scientific treatments.

12-Step Based Inpatient Treatment Centers
These inpatient drug rehab treatment centers are not necessarily faith or spiritual-based, though some are, however, they still implement 12-Step protocol within their treatment and rely heavily on creating and nurturing a sense of community within the programs. During these programs, a person works through a series of steps, building off the last, as means to grow and enhance their sobriety.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

Perhaps the most well-known of treatment or support methods for addiction, this is also one of the oldest. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) originated in 1935, however, it was not known by its current name until 1939, when the book “Alcoholics Anonymous, ” also refers to as “The Big Book,” AA’s most influential text, was published. This book continues to this day to be a guiding force within the organization. AA centers upon The Twelve Traditions and The Twelve Steps, the latter of which outlines the steps that this treatment program follows.

The Twelve Steps are a spiritual-based outline that directs individuals towards sobriety by the recognition that God, or another higher power is in control, and that by turning power over to Him, and admitting they are powerless to their addiction, they might achieve lasting recovery. These steps are further facilitated by intense and active interaction and communication with others that are involved within the program, including an individual’s sponsor.

Narcotics Anonymous (NA)

Narcotics Anonymous (NA) follows essentially the same format as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). The Twelve Steps are also foundational to NA, and are exactly the same as those of AA, encouraging an individual to conclude that they are powerless over their addiction, and that in order to achieve lasting sobriety and success, they must believe that only a reliance on God or a higher power can get them there, thusly, they must submit their will, lives, and addiction to Him.

Like AA, NA follows a group support format, encouraging honesty, admittance, and accountability among group members, as a way to progress through the steps. NA offers support for people who are addicted to other drugs beyond alcohol, however, a person with an alcohol addiction is still welcome to attend. Individuals in NA will also benefit from the guidance of a sponsor.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

Perhaps the most well-known of treatment or support methods for addiction, this is also one of the oldest. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) originated in 1935, however, it was not known by its current name until 1939, when the book “Alcoholics Anonymous, ” also refers to as “The Big Book,” AA’s most influential text, was published. This book continues to this day to be a guiding force within the organization. AA centers upon The Twelve Traditions and The Twelve Steps, the latter of which outlines the steps that this treatment program follows.

The Twelve Steps are a spiritual-based outline that directs individuals towards sobriety by the recognition that God, or another higher power is in control, and that by turning power over to Him, and admitting they are powerless to their addiction, they might achieve lasting recovery. These steps are further facilitated by intense and active interaction and communication with others that are involved within the program, including an individual’s sponsor.

Narcotics Anonymous (NA)

Narcotics Anonymous (NA) follows essentially the same format as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). The Twelve Steps are also foundational to NA, and are exactly the same as those of AA, encouraging an individual to conclude that they are powerless over their addiction, and that in order to achieve lasting sobriety and success, they must believe that only a reliance on God or a higher power can get them there, thusly, they must submit their will, lives, and addiction to Him.

Like AA, NA follows a group support format, encouraging honesty, admittance, and accountability among group members, as a way to progress through the steps. NA offers support for people who are addicted to other drugs beyond alcohol, however, a person with an alcohol addiction is still welcome to attend. Individuals in NA will also benefit from the guidance of a sponsor.

Dual Diagnosis / Co-Occurring Disorders

All across America, mental health disorders are slowly stepping out of the shadows. For far too long, these disorders have been both stigmatized and marginalized, and the people dealing with them have been cut off from the full capacity of treatment and support that is dire to their wellness. This stigma has been especially damaging to those individuals suffering from both a mental health and substance use disorder, termed a dual diagnosis or co-occurring disorder. Fortunately, as this awareness rises, more and more individuals realize the necessity for getting help for these dual diagnosis conditions, opening the door to a more balanced, drug-free life.

What Is A Mental Illness?

The World Health Organization explains that they are typically “characterized by a combination of abnormal thoughts, perceptions, emotions, behavior and relationships with others.” According to the National Institute of Mental Health, in 2014 there was 9.8 MILLION adults with a serious mental illness, whereas, there was 43.6 MILLION adults qualifying as having any mental illness.

Even more shocking, as reported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, is also in 2014, of the 20.2 MILLION adults who had a substance use disorder, nearly 40 percent (7.9 MILLION people) had a co-occurring mental health disorder.

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Adults With A Substance Use Disorder & Co-occuring Mental Health Disorder

Mental Health Disorders And Addiction

The connection between a substance use disorder and mental illness may be complex. In some cases, a person may have a preexisting mental health disorder and fall prey to substance abuse in an ill-fated attempt to self-medicate their symptoms. Other times, prolonged drug or alcohol abuse can actually cause certain co-occurring disorders, or worsen an existing one. Whatever the case, if left untreated, these dual diagnosis conditions will only serve to create an imbalanced state that typically makes an individual prone to substance abuse or relapse.

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are critical conditions, stemming from an individual’s behaviors, thoughts, and emotions regarding eating and weight regulation. They can be so extreme, that they will impede an individual’s ability to function properly within the perimeters of their life. Eating disorders can be dangerous and even deadly. These harmful behaviors typically revolve around negative and harmful patterns regarding a person’s food consumption, or lack thereof, in an attempt to alter their often false perception of their body image.

In many cases, these disorders occur with other conditions, including various mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, or substance use disorders. Fortunately, eating disorders are medical illnesses which are considered fully treatable; and dual diagnosis treatment is available within a variety of inpatient drug rehab programs. Through a variety of treatment methods, a person will begin to heal and regain balance of body and mind, while also building a drug-free life.

Here is a list of some eating disorders which can co-occur with a substance abuse disorder:

  • Anorexia Nervosa – An individual with this condition may often have an extreme fear of gaining weight, and distortedly view themselves as overweight, when in reality they may be dangerously underweight.
  • Binge Eating Disorder – An individual suffering from this disorder will consume, on recurring occasions, excessive amounts or portions of food, more than is typically considered a meal.
  • Bulimia Nervosa – Within this cycle, a person consumes a large amount of food, quickly, then precedes to purge the food from their system, by either self-induced vomiting or taking a laxative or using an enema to void the food more quickly from their body.
  • Pica – An individual with pica frequently engages in patterns of consuming non-food items, over a period of a month or longer, in a capacity that can be very harmful to their physical health.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder And Substance Abuse

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can be a debilitating condition, commonly attributed to either directly experiencing or witnessing severe instances of trauma, violence, or other life-altering events, such as rape, a tragic accident, or war. PTSD is often unwanted memories or flashbacks, vivid dreams, or upsetting moments when something in a person’s day-to-day life reminds them of the event and triggers an unsettling reaction. Higher instances of both suicide and substance abuse are often associated with this disorder.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder occurs twice as much in women as it does men, with high prevalence in war veterans. Many people try to cope with the loss or tragedy responsible for their stress, by using drugs and alcohol. Inpatient rehab facilities treat co-occurring disorders through behavioral therapies, medication-assisted treatment, counseling, and other dynamic treatment procedures.

PTSD And War Veterans

The veteran population is associated with high rates of substance abuse and various mental health disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder. The percentage of cases of PTSD varies on the service era, but according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, it can  range between 11 and 30 percent. This may result from experiences in combat, military sexual trauma, traumatic brain injury, and/or other traumatic or stressful experiences during active duty. Due to the prevalence of PTSD and other co-occurring disorders, many veterans greatly benefit from dual-diagnosis inpatient drug rehab treatment.

Trauma And Substance Abuse

Trauma is closely linked to both substance use disorders and mental health disorders. To ensure that a person receives the proper care, dual diagnosis care is often essential within a substance abuse treatment program. Trauma very often occurs during childhood, however, an individual can experience trauma at any age. Childhood trauma puts an individual at a high-risk for developing a substance use disorder later in life.

Traumatic experiences, either witnessed or experienced directly, may include:

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Neglect

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Physical or Sexual Abuse

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Intimate Partner Violence

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Natural Disaster

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Tragic Accident

As a reaction to these things, some may develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Many individuals struggle to move on with their lives, and practice self-medication with drugs or alcohol. A trauma-informed treatment approach is essential towards healing and beginning a drug-free life.

Bipolar Disorder And Substance Abuse

Formerly known as manic depression, bipolar disorder is hallmarked by clearly defined shifts in mood, energy, and activity levels. More specifically, by extreme mood swings from lively to depressed. Recreational drug use and addiction can actually trigger a state of mania.

There are four types of bipolar disorder, including bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, cyclothymic disorder (cyclothymia), and other specified and unspecified bipolar disorders. An inpatient drug rehab that is capable of offering dual-diagnosis care and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) can be essential during this time, by aiding a person in regaining the balanced and level mental state that is often considered to be the foundation of healthy sobriety. Some of most obvious indications of a bipolar disorder, are:

Major Depressive Episode

Symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder – A depressed mood for two or more weeks – Feelings of hopelessness, guilt, worthlessness, and/or anxiety.

Hypomanic Episode

Part of Bipolar II Disorder – An emotional state where irritable mood lasts for 4 or more days.

Manic Episode

Part of Bipolar Disorder – A mood state where an elevated, expansive, or irritable mood exists for a week or more.

Mixed Specifier

(Mixed Episode) When symptoms can be considered those of Bipolar I or II and a Major Depressive Disorder. Typically this is when a person experiences both depressed mood and mania.

Schizophrenia And Substance Abuse

An individual suffering from schizophrenia disorder exhibits socially atypical behaviors and struggles to understand the context of reality. This disorder drastically changes the way a person behaves, thinks, and comprehends the world around them. A person may commonly experience various psychotic behaviors, including delusions, hallucinations, and thought or movement disorders. They may also struggle to process and retain important information and not have a desire for or obtain pleasure from certain activities.
Medication-assisted treatment is typical, and certain dual diagnosis inpatient drug rehab programs may be adept at handling these co-occurring disorders, while aiding a person in building their sobriety.

Other forms of schizophrenia and disorders associated with it are:

  • Schizoaffective Disorder – A mental disorder in which a person experiences both schizophrenia symptoms, delusions and hallucinations; and mood disorder symptoms, such as depression and mania.
  • Psychosis – A mental disorder in which the person suffering completely loses touch with reality.
  • Paranoia – A mental condition characterized by delusions. These can include, unwarranted jealousy, or built-up self importance. It can be a symptom of drug abuse, chronic personality disorder, or schizophrenia.
  • Delusional Disorders – a condition with one or more delusions of thinking–typically things that could happen in real life, but do not. Delusions could refer to being stalked, being poisoned, having an illness and more.

Depression And Substance Abuse

Clinical depression can drastically, and negatively alter many aspects of your life and change the way you think, feel emotions, and encounter the world at large; it can even manifest in physical symptoms. Marked by an overwhelming sense of despair, sadness, and disinterest in activities that were previously pleasurable, individuals will also likely undergo changes in their eating and sleeping patterns, as well as in their ability to concentrate.

Depression is a very common co-occurring disorder with substance abuse and must be fully treated in order to allow a person the best chance of success within sobriety. Many inpatient drug rehab programs are poised to offer this crucial dual-diagnosis care. Usually only after two weeks of symptoms, will a person be diagnosed with a depression disorder. There are several different types of depression, brought about by various circumstances, and each marked by distinct, qualifying symptoms. These different classifications include:

Postpartum Depression

Occurs in women, typically beginning 2 weeks after they have given birth.

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Psychotic Depression

When a person suffers from this type of depression, they experience depressive symptoms set against those of psychosis, including delusions and/or hallucinations.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

More heavily affecting individuals in northern climates, seasonal affective disorder or SAD is primarily a winter-onset depression which is usually alleviated in the spring and summer months; in more rare cases, a person may experience a summer-onset SAD. The more common form is linked to decreased amounts of natural sunlight paired with an individual’s greater inclination to remain indoors during the winter.

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Major Depression

One of the two most prevalent forms of depression, this type is delineated by a person having depressive symptoms for the majority of each day, most every day, for a period at minimum of two weeks.

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Persistent Depressive Disorder

Also referred to as dysthymia, this somewhat chronic disorder is characterized by consistent depressive states over the course of two years, minimally. Within this time, a person may experience major depression intermittent with a less severe form.

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Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

Occurs before the menstrual cycle in women – during this time, a woman may feel intensely emotional, depressed, anxious, and irritable, while also experiencing fatigue or tension.

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Situational Depression

Situational depression arises from and is directly linked to a specific situation or set of circumstances, such as a major life change or traumatic experience

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Atypical Depression
  • Within this form of depression, a person reacts atypically or in an uncommon or abnormal way to certain situations, when compared to an individual within a state of clinical or major depression. Most notably, these individuals may actually experience mood elevations when experiencing positive triggers or situations within their life, a factor termed “mood reactivity.”

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Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Characterized by a constant and overwhelming state of worry individuals experiencing this may encounter a state of fear as a reaction to life circumstances or commonly become anxious over small, or even unseen things. Affecting roughly three percent of the population, if left untreated, anxiety disorder can create a host of frustrating and debilitating adverse effects that can cripple a person’s capacity to engage in and create a meaningful and productive life.

Often co-occurring with other types of mental disorders and substance abuse, an inpatient drug rehab center can aid in treatment for this, and any concurrent substance abuse or addiction. Drug and alcohol addiction can intensify, and even cultivate anxiety disorders–some other specific anxiety disorders can include:

Social Anxiety Phobia

This disorder is marked by a chronic and debilitating sense of fear and apprehension regarding social interactions and settings, which create intense amounts of fear and anxiety for the individual suffering from it.

Panic Disorder

Marked by unpredictable, yet repeated panic attacks (anxiety attacks) and characterized by an intense state of fear. Individuals suffering from these commonly harbor an intense preoccupation with thoughts of another attack and/or something negative occurring.

Phobias

A type of anxiety disorder, phobias are marked by an intense, irrational, and fearful preoccupation with an object, place, person, creature, or situation, when there is no true or apparent danger.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder And Substance Abuse

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral brain disorder. This disorder is characterized by inattention, marked by disorganization and an inability to concentrate or stay on task; hyperactivity, marked by restlessness, talkativeness, and difficulty sitting still; and impulsivity, marked by constant interruption, a lack of social etiquette, or an incapacity to take action or make choices without first thinking them through. ADHD can drastically impair a person’s life, making it difficult to function within work, social, or relationship obligations.

Further, a person may have one of three types of ADHD, specific to the symptoms listed above, including:

  • Predominantly Inattentive
  • Predominantly Hyperactive / Impulsive
  • Combined Symptoms

Substance use disorders (SUD) are heavily linked to ADHD, with some research showing that up to a quarter of those with a lifetime history of a SUD have a form of ADHD. Due to this prevalence, the necessity of individualized and attentive dual diagnosis care within an inpatient drug rehab program is essential, building sobriety and wellness through therapies, medication-assisted treatment, counseling, and other engaging modalities.

Personality Disorders

Roughly nine percent of Americans experience a personality disorder. Separated into three distinct groups, or clusters, each with their own symptoms that influence how a person perceives and interacts with the world and their peers. Cluster A encompasses those who manifest strange, bizarre, or eccentric thoughts or behavioral patterns. Cluster B includes those who are prone to erratic or unpredictable thoughts or behaviors and excess shows of emotion or dramatic overtures. Lastly, Cluster C is defined by anxiety laden or fearful states.

Often witnessed with a comorbid substance use disorder, personality disorders require expert and focused dual diagnosis care within an inpatient drug rehab center in order to garner effective results. Within these programs, a person may receive medications, learn increased and positive coping skills, dynamic interpersonal skills, and through various therapies, ways to exchange negative thoughts, emotions, or behaviors for positive ones. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) are successful methods for treating both certain personality disorders and addiction. This group of ten disorders are marked by pervasive and inflexible patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving, creating numerous struggles within social spheres and relationships for individuals affected by these often disabling disorders.

Detoxification For Alcohol

After a person has decided that they have an addiction and would like to stop drinking, the next phase of their recovery is to start a medical detoxification process. What is detoxification? It is clearing all of the drug out of the body. The withdrawals can be the most intense during detox, but the final result is recovery–and a sober life. Remember that detoxification is only the first stage to recovery, and a long term sobriety isn’t likely to last with this alone.

The first part of detoxification is abstinence from drugs or alcohol. Then a person needs to adopt  a more substantial and nutritional diet, drinking lots of fluids, getting enough rest, etcetera. A person suffering from acute alcoholism may experience hallucinations, delusions, and/or delirium tremens as part of their withdrawals, and sometimes a medicinal treatment such as Valium is required.

!
Self medication
can be dangerous, illegal, and is NOT advised.
Drug and alcohol detoxification should always be administered by a medical professional.

Detoxification For Opiates

Much like alcohol, detoxification from opiates is the first stage to recovery. It’s all about getting the drugs out of the system, sometimes the withdrawals from opioids can be painful and symptoms can include abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, sweating, muscle cramping and pain, and irritability. Sometimes  a medicinal treatment, like Suboxone, is necessary to help with the withdrawal process. Depending on the amount of an opiate that a person uses, (whether it’s heroin or prescription drugs like Oxycontin), withdrawals can last from anywhere between 1 week to 1 month–and usually start after about 2 days.

Detoxification For Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines (or “Benzos”) are used for treating anxiety, depression, panic disorders, muscle soreness, alcohol withdrawals, and more. Like withdrawals from alcohol and opiates, benzos can make a person pretty uncomfortable for a while.

Withdrawals can be severe, and should not be taken lightly, these can include:

  • Sleep disturbances and insomnia
  • Restlessness
  • Irritability, increased anxiety, or panic attacks
  • Weakness, tremors, or seizures
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and Vomiting
  • Headache Psychosis
  • Hallucinations

Detoxification is necessary to achieve sobriety, but again, it’s only a phase in recovery, detoxification does not suffice for drug addiction treatment. Detoxification should be administered by a professional.

Professional Intervention

Sometimes a professional interventionist is necessary to help a person see what their addiction is doing to them and their loved ones. Doing an intervention on a loved one can be a scary thought, because sometimes people who are addicted to drugs or alcohol will do and say things that can be hurtful to others. Having a professional interventionist to help come up with an intervention plan and walk you through it can take a load of the stress off of the family.
A lot of the time, a person struggling with addiction can try to run the show, and often times become very defensive when confronted about their problem, and rehab is suggested; a professional interventionist is someone that can coach you on how to handle those kinds of situations.

What If I Can’t Afford To Go To Rehab?

A person’s financial situation can be dependent on a number of factors, including personal resources, insurance coverage, access to a sliding fee, scholarships and grants, and various other financing options. Cumulatively, these elements may determine the length of time you’re able to stay; however, should you feel that your addiction warrants a longer stay, you should strive to not cut short your treatment—Contact Us if you have questions about financing your treatment. It’s always safer to know that you’ve fully utilized your options—because inpatient drug rehab is truly an investment in your future.

There are a lot of different things to consider when looking into treatment; where to go, how to get there, and how to pay for it. Paying for inpatient treatment can feel like a pretty hefty expense, let’s face it, most people aren’t made of money!

Fortunately, there are but there are government grants, other financial aids, sliding fees, and depending on the insurance coverage, sometimes a person can get away with a simple cash co-pay. Some inpatient rehab programs accept medicaid as well, and another option is the self-pay option (where an individual pays cash for services). There is always a way to pay for insurance, and you are definitely worth it.

Find Inpatient Treatment Centers By State

Inpatient rehabilitation can be a very effective treatment, as it takes into account the unique circumstances of each patient. Contact us today to get free information on the best residential treatment plan for you.